How To Stop Drinking So Much

Alcohol use disorder (AUD) is a chronic disease affecting millions worldwide. It is characterized by a compulsive need to consume alcohol despite the negative consequences. People with AUD often experience difficulty controlling their drinking, and they may continue to drink even when it is causing problems in their lives.

Many people with AUD try to moderate their drinking, which is often unsuccessful. There are several reasons for this. First, alcohol is a highly addictive substance. When people drink alcohol, it changes the way their brain works. Over time, these changes can make it very difficult to control drinking, even when someone wants to.

Second, AUD is often accompanied by other mental health conditions, such as depression and anxiety. These conditions can make it even more challenging to moderate drinking. For example, people with depression may drink to cope with their negative emotions, but alcohol can make depression worse.

People with AUD often live in environments that do not support moderation. For example, they may have friends or family members who drink heavily. This can make it difficult to resist the urge to drink, even when someone is trying to moderate.

The science behind addiction

Addiction is a complex disease that involves both genetic and environmental factors. When people drink alcohol, it triggers the release of dopamine in the brain. Dopamine is a neurotransmitter that plays a role in reward and motivation. The release of dopamine creates a feeling of pleasure, which is why people enjoy drinking alcohol.

Over time, repeated alcohol use can change the way the brain works. The brain becomes less sensitive to dopamine, and people need to drink more alcohol to achieve the same feeling of pleasure. This is known as tolerance.

Another change in the brain with repeated alcohol use is the stress response system becoming overactive. This means that people with AUD are more likely to experience cravings for alcohol when they are stressed.

Why abstinence is the best course of action for recovery

Given the nature of addiction, it is clear that moderation is not a realistic option for most people with AUD. The best course of action for recovery is abstinence, which means avoiding alcohol altogether.

There are several benefits to abstinence. First, it allows the brain to heal from the damage caused by alcohol use. Over time, people who abstain experience a decrease in cravings and an increase in their ability to control their emotions.

Second, abstinence can improve physical health. Alcohol can damage the liver, heart, and brain. By abstaining from alcohol, people can reduce their risk of developing severe health problems.

Finally, abstinence can improve relationships and quality of life. Alcohol can cause problems in relationships and make it challenging to manage responsibilities. By abstaining from alcohol, people can improve their relationships and live more fulfilling lives.

Rehab Not Moderation

Trying to moderate alcohol does not work for most people with AUD. The best course of action for recovery is abstinence. Abstinence can improve physical and mental health, relationships, and quality of life.

Why Do Drinkers Lie? How To Stop Drinking So Much

Lying is a common behavior among drinkers, and there are many reasons for this. Some of the most common reasons include:

  • To hide their drinking from others
  • To avoid confrontation about their drinking
  • To minimize the consequences of their drinking
  • To protect themselves from judgment or shame
  • To maintain their addiction

To hide their drinking from others

Drinkers may lie about how much they drink, how often they drink, or whether they drink at all. They may also lie about the effects of alcohol on them. For example, they may say that they are only having a few drinks when they are drunk, or they may say that they are not feeling impaired when they are.

If drinkers are confronted about their drinking, they may lie to avoid the conversation. They may deny that they have a problem, or they may minimize the severity of their problem. They may also blame others for their drinking or make excuses for why they drink.

To minimize the consequences of their drinking

Drinkers may lie to minimize the consequences of their drinking, such as missing work, getting into fights, or getting arrested. They may also lie to cover up the damage their drinking is causing to their relationships, finances, and health.

To protect themselves from judgment or shame

Drinkers may lie to protect themselves from judgment or shame. They may be ashamed of their drinking and may not want others to know about it. They may also fear the consequences of being found out, such as being fired from their job or losing custody of their children.

To maintain their addiction

Addiction is a disease that can lead to compulsive lying. Drinkers may lie to maintain their addiction by hiding their drinking, avoiding confrontation, and minimizing the consequences of their drinking. They may also lie to protect themselves from judgment or shame.

If you lie to yourself or others about your drinking, it is a sign that you have a problem. The first step to stopping drinking so much is to admit that you have a problem. Once you have admitted that you have a problem, you can seek help.

Several resources are available to help you stop drinking, such as therapy, support groups, and medication. If you are serious about stopping drinking, it is crucial to seek professional help.

Here are some tips for stopping drinking so much:

  • * Talk to your doctor about your drinking. They can help you develop a plan to quit drinking and support you.
  • * Join a support group for people who are trying to stop drinking. Support groups can provide you with encouragement and accountability.
  • * Attend the Stop Drinking Expert free quit drinking webinar
  • * Find a therapist who specializes in addiction treatment. Therapy can help you to understand the root of your addiction and develop coping mechanisms to help you stay sober.
  • * Consider taking medication to help you quit drinking. There are several medications available that can help to reduce cravings for alcohol and make it easier to stay sober.

If you are lying about your drinking, it is essential to remember that you are not alone. Many people have struggled with addiction and have been able to recover. With the right help and support, you can too.

About Us

The Stop Drinking Expert blog is a resource for people struggling with alcohol abuse or addiction. The blog is written and edited by Craig Beck, a certified alcohol and drug counselor and the author of the book “Alcohol Lied To Me.” Beck has helped over 250,000 people get sober, and his blog is one of the most popular resources for people trying to quit drinking.

The Stop Drinking Expert blog covers a wide range of topics related to alcohol abuse and addiction, including:

  • The signs and symptoms of alcohol abuse and addiction
  • The different types of treatment available for alcohol abuse and addiction
  • How to quit drinking on your own
  • How to support someone who is trying to quit drinking
  • Tips for living a sober life

The blog also features a free quit drinking webinar available daily. Beck leads the webinar, and it covers everything you need to know about quitting drinking, including:

  • How to develop a quit plan
  • How to deal with cravings and setbacks
  • How to build a support network

If you are struggling with alcohol abuse or addiction, the Stop Drinking Expert blog is a great resource for you. The blog provides comprehensive and up-to-date information on everything related to alcohol abuse and addiction. The blog also features a free quit-drinking webinar led by a certified ICS coach.

Why Choose the Stop Drinking Expert?

Many different resources are available for people trying to quit drinking. However, there are a few reasons why the Stop Drinking Expert is a great choice:

  • The blog is written and edited by Craig Beck, a certified alcohol and drug counselor and the author of the book “Alcohol Lied To Me.” Beck has helped over 250,000 people get sober and is one of the leading experts on alcohol abuse and addiction.
  • The blog covers various topics related to alcohol abuse and addiction, from the signs and symptoms of addiction to the treatment available. This makes the blog an excellent resource for people at all stages of their recovery.
  • The blog features a free quit drinking webinar that is available every day. Beck leads the webinar, and it covers everything you need to know about quitting drinking, including how to develop a quit plan, deal with cravings and setbacks, and build a support network.
  • The blog is written in a professional, academic, and medical style. This makes the blog a credible source of information on alcohol abuse and addiction.
  • The blog is optimized for search engines, so you can easily find the necessary information.

How to Get Started

The Stop Drinking Expert blog is a great resource if you are ready to quit drinking. Here are a few tips on how to get started:

  • Read the blog posts to learn more about alcohol abuse and addiction, the treatment available, and how to quit drinking.
  • Watch the free quit drinking webinar to learn everything you need to know, including developing a quit plan, dealing with cravings and setbacks, and building a support network.
  • Join the Stop Drinking Expert community on Facebook to connect with other people trying to quit drinking.
  • Contact Craig Beck directly if you have questions or need help quitting drinking.

Conclusion

The Stop Drinking Expert blog is an excellent resource for people struggling with alcohol abuse or addiction. The blog provides comprehensive and up-to-date information on everything related to alcohol abuse and addiction. The blog also features a free quit drinking webinar led by a certified alcohol and NLP counselor.

The Stop Drinking Expert blog is a great place to start if you are ready to quit drinking.

References

* National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA). Alcohol Use Disorder: A Comparison of DSM-IV and DSM-5. Available from: https://www.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/brochures-and-fact-sheets/alcohol-use-disorder-comparison-dsm-iv-and-dsm-5
* American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM). Definition of Addiction. Available from: https://www.asam.org/definition-of-addiction
* National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI). The neurobiology of alcohol addiction: from molecular to behavioral mechanisms. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3127295/

About the stop drinking expert

Craig Beck ABNLP. ABHYP. DhP. ICS. has been a professional alcohol cessation therapist since 2010. He has helped over 250,000 problem drinkers using his personal experience and professional training in the field of addiction recovery.

After struggling with his own alcohol addiction issues, Craig went on a journey of self-discovery and learning, studying the underlying causes of alcohol use disorders and how to overcome them. He has since become a board-certified Master Practitioner of NLP (Neuro-Linguistic Programming), The American Board of Hypnotherapy certified therapist, and an ICS-certified life coach specializing in alcohol addiction recovery.

Craig's personal experience with alcoholism gives him a unique perspective on the challenges of quitting drinking and staying sober. He understands the emotional and psychological factors contributing to addiction and knows how to help people overcome them.

In addition, Craig's formal training and certifications provide him with the knowledge and skills to develop effective strategies and techniques for addiction recovery. The Stop Drinking Expert approach to alcohol addiction uses a unique combination of CBT techniques and NLP reframing.

Craig's qualifications are evident in his successful track record helping people quit drinking. Craig Beck is the author of several alcohol addiction books, such as "Alcohol Lied to Me" and "The Alcohol Illusion".
His website, www.stopdrinkingexpert.com, provides a comprehensive guide on how to quit drinking, including practical tips, strategies, and resources for recovery.

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