Alcohol And Friendships… The Truth Revealed

Friends are an essential part of our lives. They provide us with companionship, support, and love. But sometimes, it can be difficult to tell if your friends care about you, especially if you’re struggling with alcohol addiction.

In this article will discuss the signs of a healthy friendship and the red flags to watch out for. We will also provide advice on how to deal with complicated friendships.

Signs of a healthy friendship

* **They make you feel good about yourself.**

True friends will make you feel accepted and appreciated for who you are and your flaws. They won’t put you down or make you feel bad about yourself.

* **They’re supportive.**

True friends will be there for you when you need them, no matter what. They will listen to you without judgment and offer you support and encouragement

* **They’re honest with you.**

True friends will be honest with you, even if it’s something you don’t want to hear. They will tell you the truth because they care about you and want what’s best for you.

* **They respect your boundaries.**

True friends will respect your boundaries and give you the space you need when you need it. They won’t pressure you to do anything you don’t want to do.

* **They have your back.**

True friends will always have your back, no matter what. They will stand up for you and defend you, even if it means putting themselves at risk.

Red flags to watch out for

* **They’re only around when they need something from you.**

If your friends only seem to be around when they need something from you, such as a favor or a loan, that’s a red flag. True friends will be there for you even when they don’t need anything from you.

* **They put you down or make you feel bad about yourself.**

True friends will never put you down or make you feel bad about yourself. If your friends are constantly criticizing you or making you feel insecure, that’s a sign that they don’t care about you.

* **They’re not supportive of your recovery.**

If your friends do not support your recovery from alcohol addiction, that’s a major red flag. True friends will want to see you succeed and will support you on your recovery journey.

* **They try to pressure you to drink.**

If your friends constantly try to pressure you to drink, that’s a sign that they don’t care about your well-being. True friends will respect your sobriety and won’t try to pressure you to do anything that could jeopardize your recovery.

* **They’re jealous of your success.**

If your friends are jealous of your success, that’s a sign that they’re not true friends. True friends will be happy for you when you succeed and will celebrate your accomplishments with you.

How to deal with complicated friendships

If you have a friend exhibiting any of the red flags listed above, it’s essential to talk to them about it. Let them know how their behavior affects you and ask them to change. It may be time to end the friendship if they are unwilling to change.

It’s also important to remember that you don’t deserve to be treated poorly by your friends. If someone makes you feel bad about yourself or does not support your recovery, you don’t have to keep them in your life. There are plenty of people out there who will love and respect you for who you are.

How alcohol damages friendships

Alcohol is a depressant that can hurt friendships in several ways. It can make people more impulsive and less inhibited, leading to saying or doing things that they later regret. It can also impair judgment and decision-making, making people more likely to engage in risky or harmful behaviors. Additionally, alcohol can worsen existing problems in a friendship, such as conflict or communication issues.

Here are some of the specific ways in which alcohol can damage friendships:

  • Impaired judgment and decision-making: Alcohol can impair judgment and decision-making, making people more likely to do things that they later regret. For example, someone who is drunk might say something hurtful to a friend, or they might engage in risky sexual behavior. This can lead to conflict and damage the trust between friends.
  • Increased impulsivity and aggression: Alcohol can also increase impulsivity and aggression. This can lead to people saying or doing things to their friends that they would not usually say or do. This can be very hurtful and damaging to a friendship.
  • Poor communication: Alcohol can also impair communication skills. This can make it difficult for friends to communicate effectively with each other. This can lead to misunderstandings, conflict, and resentment.
  • Neglected relationships: When someone is struggling with alcohol abuse, they often neglect their relationships, including their friendships. This can make their friends feel hurt and rejected.
  • Financial burden: Alcohol abuse can also be a financial burden for both the person who is struggling with it and their friends. This can lead to stress and conflict in the friendship.
  • Violence: Alcohol abuse can also lead to violence. This can be physical violence, such as hitting or pushing, or emotional violence, such as yelling or name-calling. Violence is permanently damaging to friendships.

If you are concerned that your drinking is damaging your friendships, there are several things you can do:

  • Talk to your friends: It is important to talk about your drinking and how it affects your friendships. Be honest and open with them about your struggles. Your friends may be able to offer support and encouragement.
  • Seek professional help: If you struggle to control your drinking, seek professional help. A therapist or counselor can help you to understand your drinking problem and develop a plan to address it.
  • Join a support group: Several support groups are available for people struggling with alcohol abuse. These groups can provide support and encouragement, and they can also help you to learn from the experiences of others.

Alcohol and friendships: Research findings

Several studies have examined the relationship between alcohol and friendships. For example, one study found that people who drink heavily are more likely to experience conflict in their friendships. Another study found that people who drink heavily are likelier to have friends who drink heavily. This suggests that alcohol abuse can create a vicious cycle, where friends encourage each other to drink heavily, leading to further problems in the friendship.

A study published in the journal Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research found that people who drink heavily are likelier to have friends who engage in risky behaviors, such as driving under the influence of alcohol. This suggests that alcohol abuse can lead to peer pressure and encourage people to engage in behaviors that can be harmful to themselves and others.

How to protect your friendships from alcohol abuse

If you are concerned that your drinking is damaging your friendships, there are several things you can do to preserve your friendships:

  • Set limits on your drinking: How much alcohol you drink and when. Stick to your limits, and don’t let anyone pressure you to drink more than you want to.
  • Avoid drinking when you are likely to get drunk: If you know you are more likely to drink too much in certain cases, avoid those situations. For example, if you have a friend who always gets drunk when you go out together, try to find other ways to spend time with them that don’t involve drinking.
  • Talk to your friends about your limits: Talk to them about your limits on drinking and ask them to respect them. If you tell your friends you only want to have two drinks, don’t let them pressure you to have a third.
  • Be honest with your friends about your struggles: If you struggle to control your drinking, be honest with your friends about it.

About The Stop Drinking Expert

The Stop Drinking Expert blog is a resource for people struggling with alcohol addiction. It provides evidence-based information and advice on quitting drinking and staying sober. The blog is written by Craig Beck, a certified alcohol and drug counselor who has helped over 250,000 people get sober.

Why Craig Beck is the expert on quitting drinking

Craig Beck is a highly qualified expert on quitting drinking. He has over 20 years of experience in addiction treatment and has helped thousands of people get sober. He also authorizes the best-selling book Alcohol Lied to Me: The Truth About Alcohol and How to Quit.

In addition to his professional experience, Craig Beck is a personal expert on quitting drinking. He struggled with alcohol addiction for many years before finally sobering in 2010. He knows what it’s like to be addicted to alcohol and he knows what it takes to get sober.

What you can expect from The Stop Drinking Expert blog

The Stop Drinking Expert blog provides a variety of resources for people who are struggling with alcohol addiction. These resources include:

  • Information on the dangers of alcohol addiction
  • Advice on how to quit drinking
  • Stories of people who have successfully quit drinking
  • Tips on how to stay sober

The blog also offers a free quit-drinking webinar available daily. This webinar is a great way to learn more about quitting drinking and get support from others on the same journey.

How to use The Stop Drinking Expert blog

The Stop Drinking Expert blog is a great resource for people struggling with alcohol addiction. Here are a few tips on how to use the blog:

  • Read the blog regularly. The blog is updated frequently with new information and advice on quitting drinking.
  • Search the blog for specific topics that interest you. The blog has a search function that you can use to find articles on particular issues, such as how to deal with cravings or how to tell your loved ones that you’re quitting drinking.
  • Leave comments on articles and ask questions. Craig Beck and his team are happy to answer your questions about quitting drinking. You can leave comments on articles or contact them through the website.

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Conclusion

The Stop Drinking Expert blog is an excellent resource for people struggling with alcohol addiction. It provides evidence-based information and advice on quitting drinking and staying sober. The blog is written by Craig Beck, a certified alcohol and drug counselor who has helped over 250,000 people get sober.

If you’re struggling with alcohol addiction, I encourage you to check out The Stop Drinking Expert blog. It can be a valuable resource on your journey to sobriety.

Free quit drinking webinar

The Stop Drinking Expert blog also offers a free quit-drinking webinar daily. This webinar is a great way to learn more about quitting drinking and get support from others on the same journey.

To register for the free quit drinking webinar, visit: https://www.stopdrinkingexpert.com/webinar

About the stop drinking expert

Craig Beck ABNLP. ABHYP. DhP. ICS. has been a professional alcohol cessation therapist since 2010. He has helped over 250,000 problem drinkers using his personal experience and professional training in the field of addiction recovery.

After struggling with his own alcohol addiction issues, Craig went on a journey of self-discovery and learning, studying the underlying causes of alcohol use disorders and how to overcome them. He has since become a board-certified Master Practitioner of NLP (Neuro-Linguistic Programming), The American Board of Hypnotherapy certified therapist, and an ICS-certified life coach specializing in alcohol addiction recovery.

Craig's personal experience with alcoholism gives him a unique perspective on the challenges of quitting drinking and staying sober. He understands the emotional and psychological factors contributing to addiction and knows how to help people overcome them.

In addition, Craig's formal training and certifications provide him with the knowledge and skills to develop effective strategies and techniques for addiction recovery. The Stop Drinking Expert approach to alcohol addiction uses a unique combination of CBT techniques and NLP reframing.

Craig's qualifications are evident in his successful track record helping people quit drinking. Craig Beck is the author of several alcohol addiction books, such as "Alcohol Lied to Me" and "The Alcohol Illusion".
His website, www.stopdrinkingexpert.com, provides a comprehensive guide on how to quit drinking, including practical tips, strategies, and resources for recovery.

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